The Unconscious Glitch [Scroll horizontally to view images and vertically to read text.]

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This project equates the "glitch" with Carl Jung's "archetypes" via the repetition of a portrait of Carl Jung and variations of its "glitched" image.

In Jungian psychology, archetypes are highly developed elements of the collective unconscious. Jung understood archetypes as universal, archaic patterns and images that derive from the collective unconscious and are the psychic counterpart of instinct. They are inherited potentials which are actualized when they enter consciousness as images or manifest in behavior on interaction with the outside world. They are autonomous and hidden forms which are transformed once they enter consciousness and are given particular expression by individuals and their cultures.

A "glitch" is a disruption in a system. Also, Glitch Art - the aestheticization of digital or analog errors - is a current, viable art form that includes workshops, lectures, performances, installations and screenings worldwide.

Glitch Art is not only a popular approach within the digital medium, but also in Chambers' mind has an ideal connection with Carl Jung's "archetypes" because of its disruptive aspects. A glitch just as this archetype is an archaic pattern and image, albeit fleeting, but this project (these images) actualizes the potential by moving the "unconscious" to the conscious level via the printed flux (change) in the repetitive portrait of Carl Jung. And what better portrait than that of Jung to make this comparison, and Chambers takes this further by saying that as the exhibition is viewed as a whole, highly developed elements of the "collective unconscious" come to the forefront via the multi-portraits of Jung.

The pieces for exhibition can be printed up to 30 X 20 inches. Click on poster to view larger version; right click that version to download: