Descendants 350

This photo album of Descendants of many of the First Settlers of Rhode Island pays tribute to the trials and tribulations that their Ancestors were subjected to during the early to middle 1600s. It offers a unique look and study of the State's early history as it relates to images of Descendants (contemporaries) as icons or symbols to pay tribute to and talk about their Ancestors' (First Settlers') contributions through text extracted from The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island (and other sources). This contemporary approach resurrects the past through the present: discussion of Ancestral contributions to the State's development via historical text and visualization of their Descendants, today (1986), through documentary photography to bring forth those founding bloodlines, and to offer to the viewer a likeness or similarity of features between the Descendants and their Ancestors. This project was funded by Providence 350, Inc. as a part of Rhode Island's 350th Anniversary Celebration, 1986. Chambers received a Proclamation from Edward DiPrete, Governor of Rhode Island.

(Scroll horizontally to view images [with genealogical text] and vertically to read additional information, news releases and exhibitions.)

Harold Champlin/NARRAGANSETT INDIAN TRIBE: Most of the small tribal groups, when the English arrived, were Narragansetts who eventually rose to dominate the les powerful Wampanoags and often exercised great control over tribes in other areas of Southeastern New England. Resided on the island of Canonicut, in the Narragansett Bay, and it was from the sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi, that Roger Williams obtained his first deed of the lands about Providence; they gave land not only for Providence, but at Roger Williams' request, sites for the other three original Rhode Island towns. Roger Williams thus became the sole negotiator with the Indians and hence the legal proprietor of the lands which they deeded to him. In this transaction, he was simply carrying out his principle, "the natives were the only rightful owners of all the lands which they occupied, and no foreign potentate could lawfully give away their territory." He stated, "It was not thousands, nor tens of thousands of money, could have bought of him an English entrance into this Bay; but I was the procurer of the purchase by that language, acquaintance, and favor with the natives and other advantages which it pleased God to give me."

Photo location: India Point Park, Providence, Rhode Island.

References: Rhode Island 350 historical article series, Paul F. Eno, The Providence Journal-Bulletin, 1985.; History of the State of Rhode Island, Hoag, Wade and Co., Philadelphia, 1878.

George Williams (9th gen.)/ROGER WILLIAMS: b.1599, d.1683. Summoned before the Court at Boston, his offense being that he had "taught publicly that a magistrate ought not to tender an oath to an unregenerate man and he was heard before all the ministers and very clearly confuted," as Governor Winthrop relates: sentenced to banishment. Left three days before a messenger was sent to apprehend him: he wrote, "I was sorely tossed for one 14 weeks in a bitter winter season, not knowing what bed or bread did mean." Obtained a grant of land from Massasoit on the east bank of the Seekonk River; advised by Governor Winslow that he was within the limits of Plymouth Colony. Embarked, with five companions, and landed at Slate Rock to exchange greetings with the Indians and then continued his way (by boat) to the site of his new settlement on the Moshasssuck River which for the many "Providences of the most Holy and only wise I called Providence." Took a deed from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi of "the lands and meadows upon two fresh rivers called Moashausick and Wanaskatuckett." Deeded to his friends and neighbors and equal "privilege with himself." One of the original members of the First Baptist Church; baptized by Ezekiel Holliman and then baptized him and others. Appointed Agent to England to secure Charter; during voyage wrote his, 'Key to Indian Language' (published in London), and 'Experiments of Spiritual Life and Health and Their Preservation'. Wrote a letter to his friends and neighbors in Providence and Warwick, relative to the confirmation of the Charter, charging them to "dwell in peace" and in a postscript adds, "My love to all my Indian friends." One of those "who staid and went not away" in King Philip's War and "so had a share in the disposition of Indian captives, whose services were sold for a term of years." Assistant, President, Freeman, Commissioner, Deputy, Town Councilman and Town Clerk.

Photo location: Roger Williams Monument and Burial Site, Prospect Park, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Ann G. Wilder (10th gen.) (lineal)/JOSEPH CLARKE: b.1618, d.1694. Admitted as an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck (Newport). Present at General Court of Elections and member of General Court of Trials. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church (Newport). Member of Court of Justices of the Peace to attend to the matter of "injurious and illegal acting of some of Connecticut Colony." Empowered to proportion taxes to respective towns. Freeman, Commissioner, Assistant and Deputy.

Ann G. Wilder (10th gen.) (collateral)/JOHN CLARKE: b.1609, d.1676. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Appointed to survey all of the lands in the area and bring in a map or plot. Signer (Elder) of the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Chosen to proportion land at Newport. Sent to prison at Boston after being apprehended by two constables while preaching and sentenced to pay fines for preaching and blasheming. Went to England as Agent for the Colony to procure the King's Letters Patent (Charter). Chosen as Agent again to go to England and manage an appeal to His Majesty against the "violent and illegal intrusions of Connecticut." Published a book entitled, 'Ill News from New England', giving an account of the persecutions of his friends in America. Physician, Freeman, Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Newport, Assistant, Treasurer, Deputy and Deputy Governor.

Photo location: Charter, Statehouse, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Allison H. Greene (12th gen.)/ANNE MARBURY-HUTCHINSON: b.1591, d.1643. Her interpretation of doctrine differed from that of several of the Puritan leaders, particularly as to the role of "faith" and of "works" in the scheme of salvation. Believed in the supreme importance of the relationship of man with God, or, as she called it, the "covenant of faith." "Good works", were, in her thinking, "relegated to a lesser significance than they occupied in the theology of her orthodox opponents." Held religious meetings for women at her home in Boston and criticized many of the leading citizens for living under a "covenant of works." Tried, with other Antinomian ("those against law") leaders, and banished upon their refusal to recant. Received, with others, by Roger Williams in Providence and invited to consider settling on the shores of Narragansett Bay; purchased with Roger Williams' help, the island of Aquidneck from its Indian owners and Pocasset (Portsmouth) was founded at the northern end (Rhode Island's second setlement). Differed in opinion of William Coddington and others who withdrew to southern end and founded Newport (Rhode Island's third settlement). Later, voluntarily associated, with others, themselves with the Newport inhabitants in a united government. Led many hundreds of people in a battle against "Puritan oppression": America's first "champion of women's rights" and the first to "challenge the traditional prerogatives of men." Stated, "Any effort at all to live a moral life was useless in attaining salvation." Denied that "people should arbitrarily rule other people." Married to William Hutchinson, a successful merchant. Massacred, with members of her household (with one exception), by the Indians.

Photo location: Town Hall, Portsmouth, Rhode Island.

References: Rhode Island, A Brief History, Rhode Island State Board of Education in cooperation with Rhode Island Development Council and Rhode Island Historical Society, 1955; Sidebar to Roger Williams and the Republic of Rejects, Rhode Island Historical Society.

Charles C. Whipple (10th gen.)/JOHN WHIPPLE: b.1617, d.1685. Received in Providence as a purchaser. Took an Oath of Allegiance. Granted license to keep an "ordinary." One of those "who staid and went not away" in King Philip's War and "so had a share in the disposition of Indian captives, whose services were sold for a term of years."

Photo location: North Burial Grounds, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Dorothy Greene-McGunigle (10th gen.)/JOHN FIELD: b.____, d.1686. Signer of the Providence Compact and the agreement for a form of government. Bought 25 acres and a share of meadow from Ezekiel Holliman. Freeman, Juryman and Deputy.

Photo location: Field's Point, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Dorothy Dexter-Sweeney (9th gen.)/GREGORY DEXTER: b.1610, d.1700. Lot assigned to him in Providence. Signer of the agreement for a form of government. Published Roger Williams' 'Key to the Indian Language' (in London). Joined the First Baptist Church; ordained as Pastor of the First Baptist Church; colleague with Chad Brown and William Wickenden. Absent at Long Island during part of King Philip's War. Stationer in England, Commissioner, Town Clerk, President, Freeman and Deputy.

Photo location: First Baptist Church, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Dorothy H. White (10th gen.)/JOSHUA WINSOR: b.____, d.1679. Signer of the Providence Compact and the agreement for a form of government. Complained, with others, in a letter to Massachusetts of the "insolent and riotous carriages of Samuel Gorton and his company" and petitioned Massachusetts to "lend us a neighborlike, helping hand." Sold Gregory Dexter a share of meadow west side of Moshashuck River. Caretaker for Roger Williams at Prudence Island. Freeman.

Photo location: Vineyard, Prudence Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Earl Sweet Palmer (11th gen.)/JOHN SWEET: b.____, d.1637. Had land "bounding Mr. Shelton's land on the North and near to Captain Endicott's." Presented by the Grand Jury for shooting a wolf dog of Colonel Endicott's. Had a grant of land in Providence. After his death, his widow, Mary, married Ezekiel Holliman; she and others had, according to Reverend Hugh Peters of Salem, "the great censure passed upon them in this our church," and that "they wholly refused to hear the church, denying it and all the churches in the Bay to be true churches."

Photo location: Veteran's Memorial Cemetery (Sweet family plot), Exeter, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Edward G. Wickes (10th gen.)/JOHN WICKES: b.1609, d.1675. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Moved to Warwick (Shawomet) where he and others purchased a tract of land from the Narragansett sachem, Miantonomi. Involved in a complaint by two Indian sachems for "unjust and injurious" treatment. Built a mill, with three others, for grinding corn for the town. Killed by the Indians: "He was slain by the Indians, a very ancient man," according to Callendar. Tanner, Town Councilman, Freeman, Juryman and Deputy.

Photo location: Wickes Cemetery, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Elmer Hall Palmer (10th gen.)/WILLIAM HALL: b.1613, d.1675. Admitted as an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck (Portsmouth). Appointed to take area of all highways and driftways "not set off". On a committee to "treat" with the Indians about drunkenness. Purchased lands where Roger Williams' trading post was located. Commissioner, Freeman, Deputy and Town Councilman.

Photo location: Stone Ender (Roger Williams' trading post), North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Fred Vohr (10th gen.)/SAMUEL GORTON: b.1592, d.1677. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Indicted on 14 counts when he appeared before Court on behalf of his servant maid who assaulted a woman whose cow had trespassed on his land: he said, "The government was such as was not to be subjected unto" and when the Governor said, "All you that own the King take away Gorton and carry him to prison," he replied, "All you that own the King take away Coddington and carry him to prison." After imprisonment and sentenced to be whipped, he came to Providence where his democratic ideas for church and state soon led to division of sentiment: Roger Williams wrote to Winthrop, "Master Gorton having abused high and low at Aquidneck is now bewitching and bemadding poor Providence." Took up residence at Pawtuxet, where here too was a division into parties. Moved to Warwick (Shawomet) where he and others purchased a tract of land from the Narragansett sachem, Miantonomi. Involved in a complaint by two Indian sachems for "unjust and injurious" treatment; sentenced to prison at Charlestown; released, but banished from both Warwick and Massachusetts; went to England with Randall Holden and John Greene to obtain redress for their wrongs. Published: 'Simplicity's Defence Against Seven Headed Policy' (He details the wrongs put upon the settlers of Warwick.), 'Incorruptible Key, Composed of the 110th Psalm', 'Saltmarsh Returned from the Dead' and 'Antidote Against Pharisaical Teachers'; left an unpublished manuscript, 'Exposition Upon the Lord's Prayer'. Clothier in England, Assistant, Commissioner, President, Freeman and Deputy.

Photo location: City Hall, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Charles Tillinghast (9th gen.)/PARDON TILLINGHAST: b.1622, d.1718. Received as a Quarter Sharesman in Providence (had served in Cromwell's army). Had a deed of certain land from Benedict Arnold. Pastor of the First Baptist Church and continued for many years. Overseer of the poor. Shopkeeper, Cooper, Freeman, Deputy and Town Councilman.

Photo location: Tillinghast Monument, Benefit Street, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

L. Hazard Knowles (11th gen.)/RICHARD CARDER: b.____, d.1676. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Disfranchised and name cancelled from the roll of Freeman; moved to Warwick (Shawomet) where he and others purchased a tract of land from the Narragansett sachem, Miantonomi. Involved in a complaint by two Indian sachems for "unjust and injurious" treatment: brought before the General Court at Boston, charged with heresy and sedition, sentenced and sent to prison at Roxbury; released, but banished from both Warwick and Massachusetts. Freeman, Commissioner and Deputy.

Photo location: Carder Tavern (home), Pawtuxet, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Henry L.P. Beckwith (10th gen.)/WILLIAM BRENTON: b.____, d.1674. Given the oversight of work on the prison, which was ordered to be 12 feet in length, 10 feet in width (breadth). Signer of the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Chosen to "order the days of training" at Portsmouth. Owner of extensive tracts of land in Rhode Island, in Narragansett and other places. Deputy Governor, Selectman, Freeman at Newport, President, Commissioner and Governor.

Photo location: Old St. Paul's in the Narragansett Country, Wickford, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Jeanne M. Desrosiers (11th gen.)/THOMAS OLNEY: b.1600, d.1682. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church and signer of the agreement for a form of government. Shoemaker, Treasurer, Assistant, Commissioner, Deputy and Town Councilman.

Photo location: Council Chambers, City Hall, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Joyce Shaw (11th gen.)/RICHARD TEW: b.____, d.1673. Admitted as an inhabitant of Newport. On a committee for "ripening matters that concern Long Island and in the case concerning the Dutch." On a committee to receive contributions for Agents, Roger Williams and John Clarke to travel to England to obtain Charter. On a committee for settling bounds between Portsmouth and Newport and in the matter of prison and pound. Nominated to a Special Court to appoint a jury in the case of two Indians who were imprisoned on a criminal charge. Commissioner, Freeman, Assistant and Deputy.

Photo location: Old Colony House, Newport, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Katherine B. Holmes (13th gen.)/CHAD BROWN: b.____, d.1650. Signer of the Providence Compact and the agreement for a form of government. Chosen on a committee to compile a list of the first lots situated on the Town street. Appointed on a committee "in all matters of difference" between Providence and Pawtuxet regarding the division line, and they reported that they had "seriously and carefully" considered all those differences. Ordained as Pastor of the First Baptist Church. Employed in making peace between the people of Warwick and Massachusetts. Surveyor, with other avocations.

Photo location: Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Kenneth A. Angell (11th gen.)/THOMAS ANGELL: b.1618, d.1694. Came with Roger Williams and settled Providence; deeded land which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. Signer of the Providence Compact and the agreement to form a government. Became Constable and a prime figure in the celebrated case of Chasemore. On a committee that recommended certain conditions under which the Indian captives should be disposed of by the town. Commissioner, Juryman, Constable, Freeman and Town Clerk.

Photo location: Superior Courthouse, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Marion Fry (11th gen.)/WILLIAM DYER: b.____, d.1677. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact and the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Proportioned, with three others, the land. Went to England, with Roger Williams and John Clarke, to obtain a revocation of Governor Coddington's power; left wife (Mary Dyer) abroad. Received a commission from the Assembly to act against the Dutch (Captain: Commander-in-Chief at Sea). Wife returned from England after five-year stay. Milliner in England, Secretary, General Recorder, Attorney General, Freeman, Commissioner, Deputy and General Solicitor.

Marion Fry (11th gen.)/MARY DYER: b.____, d.1660. Became a Quaker while in England. Upon returning to Boston, she was soon put into prison by the authorities, but was released at the intercession of her husband (William Dyer) and leave granted him to take her home to Rhode Island. Returned to Boston and was tried and condemned to death with Marmaduke Stephenson and William Robinson; reprived. Wrote the next day: "Once more to the General Court assembled at Boston, speaks Mary Dyer, even as before: My life is not accepted neither availeth me in comparison of the lives and liberty of the truth." Sent to Rhode Island by the magistrates, then to Long Island. Returned to Boston and brought before Governor Endicott; sentenced to be hung; put to death at the town of Boston.

Photo location: Friends Meeting House, Portsmouth, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Martha L. Sherman (8th gen.)/PHILLIP SHERMAN: b.1610, d.1687. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact. One of four proportioners of land in Newport. One of 16 who voted, "that in these troublesome times and straits in this Colony, this Assembly desiring to have the advice and concurrence of the most judicious inhabitants, if it may be had for the good of the whole, do desire at their next sitting the company and counsel." Secretary, Freeman, General Redorder and Deputy.

Photo location: Secretary of State's Office corridor, Statehouse, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Paul Nicholson, Jr. (10th gen.)/WILLIAM CODDINGTON: b.1601, d.1678. Took a deed from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi, for Aquidneck Island (Roger Williams and Randall Holden were witnesses). Signer (Judge) of the Portsmouth Compact and the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Went to England and procured a commission as Governor of the Island; colonists denied his authority ("would vacate the charter") and sent John Clarke as Agent to secure a new charter. Made acknowledgement that he had, "no more right in the purchase of Rhode Island than my associates, but only my proportion", but refused to lay down his commission. Later, publicly professed in the General Assembly of Commissioners: "I, William Coddington, do freely submit to the authority of his Highness in this colony as it is now united and that with all my heart." Judge, President, Commissioner, Deputy, Assistant, Deputy Governor and Governor.

Photo location: Old Colony House, Newport, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Raymond L. Hilton (12th gen.)/NICHOLAS EASTON: b.1593, d.1675. Admitted as an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck (Portsmouth). Signer (Elder) of the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Appointed, with John Clarke, to inform Mr. Vane by writing of the "state of things here" and desire him to "treat" about obtaining a Patent of the island from his Majesty. Appointed to a committee for "ripening" matters that concerned Long Island and in the case concerning the Dutch. Tanner, Freeman, Assistant, President, Commissioner, Deputy, Deputy Governor and Governor.

Photo location: Easton Beach, Newport, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Robert A. Greene (12th and 13th gen.)/JOHN COGGESHALL: b.1591, d.1647. Signer of the Oath of Allegiance, with 32 others, and sailed for New England, and signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Layed out the meeting house land with John Sanford. Signer (Elder) of the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Appointed to lay out lands in Newport. Silk Merchant, Assistant, Corporal, Moderator and President.

Photo location: Coggeshall Farm, Bristol, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Robert E. Hazard (13th gen.)/THOMAS HAZARD: b.1610, d.1680. Admitted as an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck (Portsmouth). Signer of the Compact prepatory to the settlement of Newport. Named one of four proportioners of land in Newport. Member of General Court of Elections. Testified as to the corn mill at Pawtuxet in a controversy between Stephen Arnold and Samuel Reape. His son, Robert, purchased a great deal of land in the North Kingstown area. Ship Carpenter and Freeman.

Photo location: Farm, North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Thomas Casey Greene, Jr. (10th gen.)/JOHN GREENE: b.____, d.1695. Came early to Narragansett, living in the family of Richard Smith. Declared, with others of Wickford, themselves in favor of being under jurisdiction of Connecticut, rather than of Rhode Island. Taken to Newport by Rhode Island authorities: asked for pardon and was promised protection by Rhode Island as a freeman of that colony; gave Oath of Allegiance to colony. Made an oath: "Forty years and more ago, Mr. Richard Smith, that I then lived with, did first begin and make a settlement in the Narragansett." Signed a petition to the King, praying that he "would put an end to these differences about the government, thereof, which hath been so fatal to the prosperity of the place; animosities still arising in people's minds, as they stand affected to this or that government." Conservator of the Peace.

Photo location: Devil's Foot Rock area, North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

William A. Rathbun, Sr. (10th gen.)/JOHN RATHBONE: b.____, d.1702. Came to Block Island (New Shoreham) with the first settlers being one of the 16 purchasers of the island. Signer, with others, of a petition to the King in regard to the writ of 'Quo Warranto', presenting their "full and free submission and resignation of power given in the Charter, and desiring to be discharged from all levies and contributions which the Assembly would expose them to in sending an agent to England, to which the petitioners do not consent." Freeman, Surveyor of Highways, Deputy and Grand Juryman.

Photo location: Surf Hotel, Block Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Herbert D. Huling (12th gen.)/RICHARD SMITH: b.1596, d.1666. Came to Narragansett country from Taunton and established a trading house (Kingstown), "giving free entertainment to travelers passing through that section." Roger Williams gave testimony after Smith's death: "He left Taunton and came to the Nanhigansick country, where (by the mercy of God and the favor of the Nanhigansick sachems) he broke the ice (at his great charge and hazard) and put up, in the thickest of the barbarians, the first English house amongst them." Desired the protection of Connecticut: wrote to Captain Hutchinson, complaining of John Greene, Sr. being taken from his house at Aquidneset by warrant from Rhode Island: "Sir, it will be necessary for you to give Connecticut intimation of their proceedings (for) we may be easily overturned by them, if they stick not by us."

Photo location: Smith Castle, North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Russell W. Greene (12th and 13th gen.)/WILLIAM CARPENTER: b.____, d.1685. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church and signer of the agreement for a form of government. Moved to Pawtuxet where he and other settlers subjected themselves to the government of Massachusetts for a 16-year period. On a committee to receive contributions for expenses of agents, Roger Williams and John Clarke to travel to England for Charter. Authorized to make assessment on Providence for arrears of taxes due Colony. Commissioner, Deputy, Assistant, Town Councilman and Governor.

Photo location: Yacht basin, Pawtuxet Cove, Pawtuxet, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Sara Greene-Smith (10th gen.)/RICHARD SCOTT: b.1607, d.1680. Signer of the Providence Compact and the agreement to form a government. One of 54 persons who had homelots assigned them. Published a letter in a book, 'A New England Fire Brand Quenchel' (being the answer of George Fox to Roger Williams' book, 'George Fox Digged Out of His Burrow'): "Friends, concerning the conversation and carriage of this man Roger Williams, I have been his neighbor these 38 years: I have only been absent in the time of the wars with the Indians, till this present. I walked with him in the Baptists' way about three or four months, but in that short time of his standing I discovered he must have the ordering of all their affairs or else there would be no quiet agreement amongst them." Further charged Roger Williams with inconsistency in "professing liberty of conscience and yet persecuted those who did not join in his views." It is claimed that he was the first Quaker in Providence. Shoemaker, Freeman and Deputy.

Sara Greene-Smith (10th gen.)/CATHARINE MARBURY-SCOTT: b.1617, d.1687. Governor Winthrop of Massachusetts states, "At Providence, things grew still worse for a sister of Mrs. Hutchinson (Anne Marbury-Hutchinson), the wife of one Scott (Richard Scott), being affected with Anabaptistry and going to live at Providence, Mr. Williams (Roger Williams) was taken by her to make open profession thereof and accordingly was rebaptized by one Holy man (Ezekiel Holliman), a poor man late of Salem. Then Mr. Williams rebaptized him and some ten more. They also denied the baptizing of infants and would have no magistrates." Present at Boston when her future son-in-law, Christopher Holder, had his right ear cut off for the crime of being a Quaker; protested in these words: "It was evident they were going to act the works of darkness, or else they would have brought them forth publicly and have declared their offenses that all may hear and fear." Committed to prison for this utterance and whipped; answered, "If God calls us woe be to us if we come not and I question not but he whom we love, will make us not to count our lives dear unto ourselves for the sake of his name. To which your Governor John Endicott replied: And we shall be as ready to take away your lives as ye shall be to lay them down." Her daughter, Patience, was sent to prison after testifying (in Boston) against persecution of Quakers. Another daughter, Mary, was apprehended (in Boston) and put in prison for a month when she went to visit Christopher Holder in prison.

Photo location: Friends Meeting House, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Todd A. Greene (13th and 14th gen.)/RICHARD WATERMAN: b.1590, d.1673. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church and signer of the agreement for a form of government. Among the band of Gortonites arraigned at Boston: the sentence of the Court was imprisonment for most of the offenders, but Waterman was released on payment of a fine, only to be again arrested later and then imprisoned; Senate declared: "Richard Waterman being found erroneous heretical and obstinate ...". When relesed, the penalty of a return to Massachusetts was to be death. Freeman, Commissioner, Juryman and Warden.

Photo location: Waterman House, University Club, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Phillips Lillibridge (11th gen.)/STUKELEY WESTCOTT: b.1592, d.1677. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church and signer of the agreement for a form of government. Received as inhabitant of Warwick. On a committee to confer with the Indians about fencing. Appointed to keep a "house of entertainment." Foreman of Grand Inquest: "We who are engaged to see the dead Indian, do find by diligent search that he was beaten, which was the cause of his death." Authorized to keep an "ordinary" for entertainment of strangers during the time the King's Commissioners held court in Warwick. Commissioner, Surveyor of Highways, Juryman, Assistant, Freeman and Deputy.

Photo location: City Hall, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Franklin G. Arnold (12th gen.)/WILLIAM ARNOLD: b.1587, d.1676. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church and signer of the agreement for a form of government. Moved to Pawtuxet where he and other settlers subjected themselves to the government of Massachusetts for a 16-year period. Wrote a letter to the Massachusetts Governor complaining of the injustice shown by the Indians by the Warwick settlers, "who are going on with a high hand." Wrote to Massachusetts, protesting against Roger Williams' proposal errand to England seeking a charter. Expressed a desire, along with other Pawtuxet settlers, to be reunited with Providence.

Photo location: City Hall, Cranston, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Sharon W. Tetreault (12th gen.)/GEORGE GARDINER: b.____, d.1677. Admitted to the island of Aquidneck (Newport) where he purchased 58 acres of land. Present at General Court of Elections. Freeman, Constable, Senior Sergeant, Ensign, Commissioner and Juryman.

Sharon W. Tetreault (12th gen.)/HERODIAS (LONG-HICKS) GARDINER: b.____, d.____. Delivered her religious testimony at Weymouth, for which she was carried to Boston, before Governor John Endicott who sentenced her to be whipped with ten lashes and held in prison 14 days. Petitioned her husband, George Gardiner, before the Assembly: having lived with her husband 18 or 20 years and by him had many children, desired of the Assembly, "The estate and labor he had of mine, he may allow it me and house upon my land I may enjoy without molestation and that he may allow me my child to bring up, with maintenance for her and that he be restrained from troubling me more."

Photo location: Family Court, Newport, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Edwin Fenner (8th gen.)/ARTHUR FENNER: b.1622, d.1703. Moved from Connecticut to Providence after his father's death. Appointed by the Assembly as Chief Commander of the King's Garrison. Member of a court martial held at Newport to try certain Indians. Appointed on a committee to put laws and acts of the Colony into "such a method, that they may be put in print." Justice of the General Quarter Session and Inferior Court of Common Pleas. He, with others, were chosen by the Assembly to "run" the northern line of the Colony. Lieutenant in Oliver Cromwell's Army, Commissioner, Freeman, Assistant, Deputy, Town Councilman and Treasurer.

Photo location: Police and Fire Headquarters, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Samuel C.H. Dumas (11th gen.)/SAMUEL BENNETT: b.____, d.1684. Came to Providence as a cooper. Bought house and lot, orchard and meadow fom Stukeley Westcott. Sold land to William Carpenter. Took Oath of Allegiance. Purchased 100 acres of land in East Greenwich. General Sergeant, Freeman, Sergeant, Commissioner, Grand Juryman and Deputy.

Photo location: Superior Courthouse, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Barbara Woodruff (13th gen.)/EZEKIEL HOLLIMAN: b.____, d.1659. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church: baptized Roger Williams and in turn baptized by him; assisted Roger Williams in his pastorate. Moved to Warwick (Shawomet) where he and others purchased a tract of land from the Narragansett sachem, Miantonomi. Purchased, with Randall Holden, Potowomet from Indian sachem, Taccomanan (on behalf of the Warwick inhabitants). Appointed, with John Greene, Jr., to view the general laws of the Colony and report to the next Court of Commissioners what they may find "defective or any way jarring." Member of Court of Trial. Town Councilman, Commissioner, Freeman, Magistrate and Warden.

Photo location: First Baptist Church, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Bruce C. MacGunnigle (12th gen.)/WILLIAM WICKENDEN: b.____, d.1670. Signer of the Providence Compact and the agreement for a form of government. He and others complained in a letter to Massachusetts of the "insolent and riotous carriages of Samuel Gorton and his company" and petitioned Massachusetts to "lend us a neighborlike, helping hand." Ordained as Pastor of the First Baptist Church. Commissioner, Freeman and Deputy.

Photo location: Wickenden Street area, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Rodney Bailey (11th gen.)/RANDALL HOLDEN: b.1612, d.1692. Witnessed, with Roger Williams, a deed of Aquidneck Island from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi to William Coddington. Signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Disfranchised and name cancelled from the roll of Freeman: moved to Warwick (Shawomet) where he and others purchased a tract of land from Miantonomi. Involved in a complaint by two Indian sachems for "unjust and injurious" treatment: brought before the General Court at Boston, charged with heresy and sedition, sentenced and sent to prison at Salem; released, but banished from both Warwick and Massachusetts; went to England, with Samuel Gorton and John Greene, to obtain redress for their wrongs. He, with others, agreed to build a mill to grind corn for the town. Purchased, with Ezekiel Holliman, Potowomet from Indian sachem, Taccomanan (on behalf of the Warwick inhabitants). Testified about the gift of Dyer's Island to William Dyer. Auhorized, with others, to make assessments on towns for arrears of taxes. Appointed on a committee to draft a letter to the King. Marshal, Corporal, Moderator of Town Meetings, Treasurer, Assistant, Commissioner, Freeman, Deputy, Member of Justice of Court of Common Pleas.

Photo location: Treasurer's Office, City Hall, Warwick, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).

Thomas E. Greene (11th gen.)/JOHN GREENE: b.1597, d.1658. Spoke against the Magistrates of Massachusetts; fined and told to stay outside of their jurisdiction. Deeded land in Providence which Roger Williams bought from the Narragansett sachems, Canonicus and Miantonomi. One of the original members of the First Baptist Church. Purchased the land called Occupassuatuxet from Miantonomi. Moved to Warwick (Shawomet) where he and others purchased a tract of land from Miantonomi. Involved in a complaint by two Indian sachems for "unjust and injurious" treatment; banished from both Warwick and Massachusetts; went to England with Samuel Gorton and Randall Holden to obtain redress for their wrongs. Surgeon (Salisbury), Commissioner and Freeman.

Photo location: Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island.

Reference: The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969 (Originally published in Albany, New York, 1887.).


This unique coupling of present and past bloodlines makes this project special: Rhode Island's early history is referenced, and the Ancestors'/First Settlers' contributions in formulating the State's history are genetically perpetuated through today's Descendants of those First Families, our contemporaries and those individuals who are alive and interact with other residents of the State during our present time. This sense of presence or immediacy is the key factor that brings this project to the forefront for consideration and discussion. The expression and posture of the Descendants within the images are essentially the same throughout the series of photographs to establish a common thread or connection, which indicates a unity of pride for their Ancestry. Even though the photographs can be viewed strictly as portraiture, they are also a collection of icons or symbols that presents itself through flesh objects (Descendants) as gifts of gratitude, respect and admiration for those Ancestors/First Settlers who founded and settled a new society based on freedom from religious persecution.

News coverage: Tom Chambers unique exhibit sponsored by Providence 350. The stern features of Trooper William A. Rathbun, Sr. gaze out at the onlooker from the veranda of the Surf Hotel on Block Island, surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean and the whispers of history. The photograph of the seated Rathbun is one of 40 portraits of Rhode Islanders, all descendants of founding families, by Tom R. Chambers, sponsored by Providence 350, Inc. The exhibit is on display in the Fleet Center, 50 Kennedy Plaza, through next Wednesday. Chambers, official photographer for Mayor Joseph R. Paolino, Jr., said the original idea was his own. "I approached Providence 350, and they liked the idea and gave me a $1300 grant," he said. Rathbun is a 10th-generation descendant of John Rathbone, one of 16 purchasers of Block Island, who died in 1702. Another portrait shows Auxiliary Bishop Kenneth A. Angell, whose ancestor, Thomas Angell (1618-1694) settled Providence with Roger Williams and served as commissioner, juryman, constable, freeman and town clerk. The bishop is shown relaxed in the Superior Court House. Charles C. Whipple crouches over an ancestral tombstone in Providence's North Burial Ground. He is a 10th-generation descendant of John Whipple, 1617-1685, a purchaser. Harold Champlin shows another side of the founding families - a member of the Narragansett Indian tribe, he stares out from a pier at India Point Park, the waters of the Providence River dark behind him. Chambers found his subjects through publicity in newspapers, magazines and television. "Several people called in," he said, "then I got a call from Robert Allen Greene. He's a 12th and 13th generation - two different families - descendant of John Coggeshall, 1591-1647, a signer of the Portsmouth Compact. Robert Greene is a genealogist. I would give him certain first family names I had researched out, and he would plug in the descendants." Chambers said he relied on the 1969 revised edition of the Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island for his data. "I would reach people and explain the project," he said. "I would ask if they were willing to let me take a documentary portrait. Not one person refused me. They have a lot of pride in their ancestry." (Thomas J. Morgan, Staff Writer, Providence Journal-Bulletin, Providence, Rhode Island, 1986)

News coverage: Descendants 350, an exhibition by fine arts photographer, Tom R. Chambers, views like a stately procession of New England nobility. The show consists of black-and-white portraits of 40 Rhode Island scions who singularly and collectively convey an intense bond with local governmental, social and religious beginnings. Chambers photographed each descendant in settings reflective of their ancestors' respective backgrounds. So we meet William A. Rathbun, Sr. looking stern-faced on the deck of the Surf Hotel on Block Island. He's a 10th-generation descendant of John Rathbone (b. -, d. 1702), who, along with 15 fellow settlers, made his mark on the Ocean State by purchasing Block Island, according to The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island. George Williams appears in front of the Roger Williams Monument and Burial Site at Prospect Park in Providence. Roger Williams (b. 1599, d. 1683), of course, founded "Providences of the most Holy and only wise I called Providence." Pictured in the Council Chambers at Providence City Hall, Jeanne M. Desrosiers, an 11th-generation descendant, rekindles the spirit of Thomas Olney (b. 1600, d. 1682), a deputy and town councilman whose signature was among those that ratified this state's government. Ninth-generation scion, Charles C. Tillinghast, gazes at the lens from aside the Tillinghast Monument, which stands on Benefit Street in commemoration of Pardon Tillinghast (b. 1622, d. 1718), pastor of the First Baptist Church and overseer of the poor. "They strike a certain pose, posture or expression to convey a sense of self-worth, pride and an awareness of my presence," says Chambers of his ancestral subjects. "Descendants/350, A Photographic Tribute to the First Settlers of Rhode Island," which was funded by Providence 350, Inc., is hanging in the Roger Williams Park Museum through Feb. 15. The exhibition will be displayed at the University of Rhode Island's Extension Center Gallery from March 2 through 27 and at the Narragansett Pier Free Library from April 5 to May1. (Providence Business News, Providence, Rhode Island, February 2, 1987)

   

News coverage: Museum showing 350th photo project. A photographic linkage of past and present is on display through Aug. 29 at the Warwick Museum. The exhibit presents "Descendants 350: A Photographic Tribute to the First Settlers of Rhode Island," a collection of works by Tom R. Chambers of Providence, originally produced as part of the State's 350th Anniversary Celebration last year. The 40 photos show living descendants of Rhode Island's founders in settings around the State connected with their ancestors?role in the State's beginning. A number of notable Warwickites from the past are represented by the current generation. Chambers, who is staff photographer for Providence Mayor Joseph Paolino, Jr., took six months to complete the project, which includes a text detailing the history of the ancestor of each photo subject. "Even though the album of photographs can be viewed strictly as portraiture," wrote Chambers in an introduction to the exhibit, "it is also a collection of icons or symbols that presents itself through "flesh" objects (the descendants) as gifts of gratitude, respect and admiration for those ancestors who founded a new society (Rhode Island) based on religious freedom and rights for all." Each photo is what photographers call an "environmental portrait," with the subject person placed in an environment that relates something about him/her and his/her heritage. For example, Fred Vohr, a 10th-generation descendant of Warwick founder, Samuel Gorton, is seen outside the Warwick City Hall. Other Warwick-connected persons are: Phillips Lillibridge, 11th-generation descendant of Stukeley Westcott; Edwin G. Wickes, 10th-generation descendant of John Wickes; Thomas E. Greene, 11th-generation descendant of John Greene; Rodney Bailey, 11th-generation descendant of Randall Holden; Russell W. Greene, 12th-generation descendant of William Carpenter; Franklin G. Arnold, 12th-generation descendant of William Arnold; and Samuel C.H. Dumas, 11th-generation descendant of Samuel Bennett. Another interesting aspect of the show is a joint project of the Museum and Insight that allows visually-impaired persons to "see" the exhibit. An audio tape recording has been made with a description of each photo and a recitation of its accompanying historical text. Visually-impaired museum goers can listen with a tape recorder to get a sense of the look of the exhibit. (Warwick Beacon, Warwick, Rhode Island, June 18, 1987)

News coverage: Exhibit on R.I. settlers is at State House. Show pairs photos of descendants with accounts of their ancestors?lives. It probably wasn't funny to John Sweet, but three-and-a-half centuries and 11 generations later, Earl Sweet Palmer, Jr. Gets quite a chuckle out of his ancestor's antics. It seems John Sweet, one of Rhode Island's original settlers, ran into a little trouble back in the 1600s, when he was "presented by the grand jury for shooting a wolf dog of Colonel Endicott's." Whether Sweet was convicted of that crime remains unclear, but Palmer said yesterday that the shooting was probably a sign of the times. "Every one of them was a rebel," Palmer said with a laugh as he read a bit about his family history yesterday at the State House. Palmer was one of several descendants of the original settlers who attended the opening of a photo exhibit honoring their ancestors. Descendants/350, by photographer Tom R. Chambers, was completed in 1986 as part of the State's 350th Anniversary Celebration. It has been exhibited at seven sites, and is at the State House for a 10-day showing, through July 1. The exhibit pairs photos of the descendants with brief accounts of their ancestors' lives. The 40 original settlers' names are familiar: Williams, Brown, Waterman, Angell, Wickenden, Greene, Coggeshall. The exhibition is to be shown later this summer at the Old Colony House in Newport. (Kevin Sullivan, State House Bureau, Providence Journal-Bulletin, June 21, 1988)

EXHIBITIONS

Descendants 350 (solo show), Rhode Island State Archives, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (accepted by the Secretary of State as a part of the Rhode Island State Archives Permanent Collection), 1991.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The Old Colony House, Newport, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (sponsored by the Secretary of State's Office, Rhode Island), 1988.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The State House, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (sponsored by the Secretary of State's Office, Rhode Island; and received a Governor's Proclamation), 1988.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The Barrington Public Library, Barrington, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (sponsored by the Daughters of the American Revolution), 1988.

Descendants 350 (solo show), Faculty Club Gallery, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The Warwick Museum of Art, Warwick, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The Narragansett Pier Free Library, Narrangansett, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (sponsored by the Narragansett Historical Society), 1987.

Descendants 350 (solo show), CCE Gallery, The University of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The Roger Williams Park Museum, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (sponsored by the City of Providence), 1987.

Descendants 350 (solo show), The Fleet Center Gallery/50 Kennedy Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (grant - Providence 350, Inc.), 1986.


Xerox copies of some of the events/exhibitions: